Conversations

Question 1: What is the value of regional history to our community?

  • To build a stronger community in the future we all need to know about our past "Look were we have been and look where we're going"

  • Ann Root, Mike Burrill, Carolyn Burrill, Ben Truwe, Hew MCElroy, Larry Smith, Carolyn Kingsnorth,

    Chelsea Rose, Chris Walker, Linda Turner, Phil Long, Pat Harper

    Discussion of budget and finances before questions began,

    Question 1:

    AR: Didn’t fly well as ballot measure but we’re all in favor of it. We’re rooted in the history, woven into the fabric, but new people don’t know history, like community but “here to create a culture”. WE don’t talk it up, celebrate.

    CR-people drawn to Jacksonville because of history

    Ann-how deep is it?

    CR-do they have to? As log as they celebrate and it’s a draw. I see intrinsic value, but SOHS argument is we can facilitate heritage tourism and augment economic value. She sees people are increasing it

    T Burl- Jville Booster, walking path that shows people history would be popular

    Larry S- 8 mile hike with 6th graders, kid said “I didn’t realize history was so interesting, I didn’t know J’ville had so much history, I want to learn more.” Kid is from Roosevelt. A few stories and kids connect. 

    Chris – when younger reading about it didn’t resonate, but visiting places, the experience is what makes kids excited, engaged.

    Larry-Heritage fair so important. 1000 4th graders in Medford alone, we only serve 800 at the Fair

    Chelsea- scaleable nature, we have wild west, gold rush, etc. Appeal not only to locals but tourists.

    Travel Oregon gives out grant money

    Walking tours, haunted tours.

    Chelsea-tendency to focus on kids and retired folks, demographic in between is missed. Support pub talks. Chelsea partnered with wineries and charged – made 1000s for hist society. Chelsea mentioned qtly events that are successful (recorder didn't note the details of those events)

    Carolyn – kids and retirees are audience for history

    Chris- but 30-50 are spending years

    Chelsea – need all of the groups.

     

  • Doug McGeary (SOHS President) Susan Walsh (Provost & Vice President for Academic Affairs            Sue Densmore (Communications Consultant) Ron Kramer (past Executive Director of Oregon Public Radio) Dr. Lee Murdock (Pediatrician, Family Nurturing Center Board) Ken Gregg  (Jacksonville Councilman) Lindsay Berryman (past Medford Mayor, Heart of Medford Association) Jeff LaLande (SOHS) Linda Turner (SOHS)  Vicki Ann Bryden (SOHS) Sheila Baker (SOHS) Alice Mullaly (SOHS) Larry Mullaly (SOHS)

     

    • Ron Kramer: Valuable to help newcomers better understand our community and an important resource for our schools.
    • Lee Murdock: Hanley Farm is wonderful environment for those in rehabilitation and their children. It ties young people to the land and nature.
    • Lindsay Berryman: History is all about people, where they lived, how they built their culture. Children are fascinated to learn about the history of a place, it connects the dots for them.
    • Vicki Bryden:  Larry Smith just spoke to an elementary class in Jacksonville about the Chinese and the early mines.  They were spellbound for two hours. This is what history can do.
    • Susan Walsh: Southern Oregon University would benefit from access to the SOHS collections. Both efforts need to forge stronger ties. The digitizing work by both has great possibilities if we worked together.
    • Ken Gregg: There are many values to regional history. These include strengthening our identity, teaching us critical thinking skills,better understanding our community, helping us craft better solutions for economic development, providing us with leadership role models, building a foundation for the future, and encouraging us to better preserve the past.

     

  • Attending: Sue Kupillas, Mary Anne Pitcher, Ben Truwe, Larry Mullaly, Doug McGeary, moderator, Alice Mullaly, note taker

    SK--Children don't’ get enough history. They need it to know who they are.

     

    DM—People’s identity is found in history as is our community’s

     

    SK—for me, art history was so much more interesting than our history class which seemed focused on wars.

     

    MP—History has always been all around me,. It defines who we are. I didn’t appreciate all our advances until I read John Adams.

    The ‘why’ is not covered in the video and needs to be addressed especially for millennials. They would not appreciate the video.

    Groups must adapt or die.

     

    DM—recent history is often more appreciated because we remember a piece of it

     

    MP—Things like bullying have a long history but “If you don’t know better, you can’t do better?”

    Kids are hands on and what we do must reflect all learning styles

     

    SK—Art in schools gets kids to think about how things used to be done.

     

    DM—Children and other learn lessons about what was before and why it is important

     

     

     

  • Moderated by Doug McGeary, attended by: Tim Balfour; Anne Billeter; Eli Mathews; Bob Hackett; Todd Kepple; Doy and Rick Towsley; Dick Gordon; Amy Drake; Chris Sanz; Aaron Hoefling; Ben Truwe; Sheila Baker; Doug McGeary; Linda Turner; Pam and Doug Sasseen; Pat Harper



    pam s people come for history, but how do they find it
    anne b tourism that we can build on, people stay one day longer if they are doing history research
    amy regional history sets context for community, explains neighborhoods, services, etc.
    tk makes each community unique, without it all communities are Walmart and MacDonalds
      he controls past controls future, value in understanding the past, lost in modern culture, helps us dictate where we are going to go
    sanz brings pride, especially for people who have been here. For newcomers, they want to know and make connections to the community
    TK "Why things are the way they are" from Pat Bushy, K falls editor. New reporters eventually learned things were done the way they were because it works for K Falls
    doug confidence for people who come from a place
    tim balfour sense of place, makes people feel the place is special
    pam s makes newcomers feel involved
    anne b sense of belonging, we have richness with local historical societies, at SOHS we have a huge collection
    dick g preserve past and present to share with younger generations. Native Americans struggling to teach younger people their heritage, customs, dances, drums, tough on them

     

  •    What is the value of regional history to our community? I think that regional history is extremely valuable. It's more about how it's presented. Its more about how it's digested, used and purposed that has more value. Look at the new normal we are now facing and the smokey summer. History can show us clearly that this did happen or did not happen before. History can show us how we used to look 100 years ago and 50 years ago and how the freeway changed everything. History can show us why and how. History can help us retain our uniqueness as the country homogenizes. History can help us remember great women and men that were risk takers and change agents and built our region. 

  • Community Conversations Ashland Public Library August 22, 2018

    Attending: Linda Walker-Turner, Larry Mullaly, Sam Whitford, Dennis Powers, Mary Jane Cedar Face, Mary O’Kief, Mollie, Owens, Ben Truwe, Phil Long, Bill Gates, Dick Thierolf, Susan Kiefer, George Kramer, Alice Mullaly, Doug Mc Geary

    Dr. Phil Long introduced and moderated the event. Alice Mullaly took notes.

    1. Value

    MO—exciting that history came alive with family visits to SOHS events and museums. So valuable to have materials available for students. It is also how we build on diversity.

    DT—Defines who the community is and what its history is. Requires an institution that represents that history. This community has trouble defining itself. Without SOHS it would be worse.

    GK—Southern Oregon has become a transitional community. Regional history is important to those new to the community. Value to learning how this became a desirable place to come to. Opportunity to get to those people, plant seeds.

    MOK—origins and evolving history

    SK—groups of people in Prospect have collected many things. They are aging and don’t know what to do with the things—example 8-track video interviews done several years ago that document the logging industry in Prospect, Prospect obituaries, etc. Need organizational structure to take care of these materials.

    PL—Want others to value what we do.

    GK—OCT and OHS do oral histories

    SK—Timber Carnival in Prospect may be the last of its kind and those who run it are aging. People are moving away.

    DM—Important to share and to remember.

     

  • Attending: Doris and Lynn Sjolund, Valerie Root, Barbara Moore, Jennifer Laughlin, David Sours, Al Minnick, Sheila Baker, Doug Mc Geary, Cyndi Noyes, Larry Mullaly (Moderator), Alice Mullaly (recorder)

     

    1. Value:

    VR-- Knowing history helps us not repeat mistakes of the past

    CN—Value to new people to the area to understand why things work the way they do

    DS—imagination—children enjoy touring Hanley House—they aren’t bored.

    DS—people go home so happy and excited from events

    CN—story of person calling in and missing experiences that had been important to her to share with her own children.

    LM—had not thought about how the strand of local history has been broken and we have a chance to reestablish it.

    DM—as we get older we appreciate history more

    CN—history is about making connections

    DS—younger people don’t have time for thinking about history between jobs and families

     

  • Bill Maentz, Carolyn Kingsnorth, Bill Gates, Pam Sasseen, Pat Harper, Doug McGeary, Liz Koester, Doug Sasseen, Sue Muslof, and 5 guests attended

    Comparisons were made between the Southern Oregon Historical Society and other local museums, including Gold Hills, Butte Falls, and others. One person said history centers are valuable to new residents as many seek out such organizations to learn about the area. Additional comments include: “History helps us to understand what we have now by understanding the history of the area. Historical stories fill in the gaps.” “History is who we are and where we come from. People care when they have knowledge.”

     

  • Participants were Larry Mullaly (Moderator), Paden Voget, Sharon Feil, Greg Applen, Pam Sasseen, Ron Hillers, Jerry Doran, Judith Meuser, Doug Loughdal (FNC), Kristen Galabrun (FNC), Pam Sasseen, Rocky Wales, Rhonda Nowak, Tam Moore; Isaiah Webb.

    1. Opportunity to look at the past and enable us to not make decisions that would be detrimental to our future;
    2. Good for the newer generation to learn about old ways;
    3. Good for people to learn about the history of the area, especially when few are from this area;
    4. One way to attract people to come to the area and tourism; and
    5. Informs people of the roots and history of the region.

     

     

  • Present: Alice Mullaly, Linda Turner, Doug McGeary, Hazel Smith, Kevin Keating, Vicki Bryden, Carol Holst, Monte Holst, Pat Harper

    V: Gives us identity

    LT: Southern Oregon people shouldn't have to travel to see history, visit museum

    HS: School house is full of our photos, also Valley View Orchards, other places (Food for Less)

    MH: Young people who move in and new people are unaware of history

    HS: Denver history museum is enormous, kids on tour every day, her kids still remember Jacksonville tours

    LT: I remember them

    KK: History is de-emphasixed in schools in favor of math and science. History adds to culture. we could advertise at Airport

    CH: People don't relate things we do to SOHS

    VG: People don't know Hanley Farm

    LT: Gold Hill Historical Society - history is everywhere in their building. We can't attract people because we don't display artifacts

    DM: Memory is important

    CH: Why do some of us value history?
    HS: Example, smoke has never been this bad in the valley, people want to know that kind of information about the past

    MH: THis building is a good place for a museum. They just completed a long road trip, "all towns had museums"

    CH: Museums are also information centers

    KK: People don't know they value history until they actualy see it

     

  • Present: Phil Long, Billie Taylor, Alice Mullaly, Hew McElroy, Bill Gates, Hazel Smith

    Hazel: annual visit to cemetery and museum, what life was like; why is it important to know the changes, important to look back

    Billie: Working from past to embrace future.

    Bill: ditto, where's we've been to make best decisions

    Hazel: People are looking for things during the day that show what happened and how this community became what it is today

    Hew: People seek out museums when traveling

    Phil: We hold stories about why the things are here that they have come to see

    Hazel: e.g., yesterday a professor looking for Boyle information in the Archives

    Bill: Draws tourism

    Billie: Nothing in Medford to point people to

     

  • Attendees: Ron Brown, Stephanie Butler, Larry Mullaly, Kira Lesley, Carolyn Kingsnorth, Phil Long, Robert Hamilton, Gretchen Hamilton, Gayle Lewis, Jeff LaLande, Pat Harper, Andrea Patterson, Jack Patterson.

    Jeff: Feedback on Power Point, end with thank you and include mention of the 2016 ballot measure.

    Larry: Should Carnegie be mentioned? (no responses)

    Gretchen: History is important and fascinating, but people don't know that

    Gayle: Way to connect people who move here, especially when it's the last place they intend to live (retirees)

    Stephanie: For you, lense to view current life, perspective from native times to the present, makes them reflect on their habits, etc.

    Jeff: Lots of people have "profound vacant spot" when it comes to historical knowledge, they want to fill it in. There's a market.

    Carolyn: Audience is 4th graders and people in 50s and 60s. They don't want the names, dates, places and tests they associated with history classes. They want stories.

    Ron: Explosion of interest in family histories, genealogies, we need to open the doors for them.

    Jack: Value? What does that mean? It's situational and most get along without interest in history. Also, the perception is there that it is already being done, and will continue.

    Andrea: She and Jack are disappointed we don't have a museum in Jackson County

    Larry: Value is a fluid word, to Chamger it's money

    Notes taken by Stephanie:

    Value of regional history to our society: view of the retirement communities and that it will be
    their final place of residence and are hungry for the history and for good, thought provoking
    history of our region. Youth use the lens of history to understand their place in the world and
    how their lives relate to those from the past. History is about the people who lived it in their
    stories. Explosion of interest in genealology will help to give perspective to their own lives. Most
    people in mid-life can get along well without history and those younger kids and older adults are
    really the ones who are most impacted by it.

     

     

  • Attended: Larry and Alice Mullaly, Ben Truwe, Al Densmore, Doug McGeary, Trevor Thorndike, Dick Moore, Shelia Whitesitt, Pat Harper, Tam Moore, Dawna Curler, Liz Koester, Peter and Linda Kreisman, Billie, and Nancy Hamlin

    Peter: quote from Daniel Boorstein, Librarian of Congress. “Trying to plan for the future without knowing the past is like trying to plant cut flowers.”

    Peter: No diversity in Southern Oregon when he was young, people need to know that

    Dawna: knowing history develops sense of place, connections to community lead to investment in helping community. History anchors people to a place.

    Dick: History begins with you

    Al Densmore: value to guests, we lost tremendous # of guests and people who move in. Our responsibility to tell our story to guests /tourists and to the people who live here.People who didn't know history of Bear Creek complian to City Council because they didn't know how bad it had been

    Trevor: Fan of architecture, need diverse experiences, not everything modernized, old architecture needs to be preserved for the buildings tell our history

    Linda: History informs political opinions and understanding

    Tam: History important because new people need to relate to and understand Oregon laws

     

Question 2: What do you think is the community's perception of SOHS?

  • Trevor: Brings people together, eg Living History. People who attend relate SOHS to those events

    Peter:Management problems led to loss of funding by Commissioners, some directors not cooperative. ARchives staff made errors, such as not dating or tracking. What happened to SOHS in the 1990’s when we lost the money from the 1948 tax issue. Do people know about this and why did it happen

    Al: Most people don't have a vew

    Sheila: people knew us better years ago when we had money and did a lot in the community. Some bad blood, Jack Walker didn't like us. "When we had money we were arrogant (quote from Commissioner?)

    Sheila: Perception is positive, but not enough of it

    Liz: Agrees, "how can they not know?"
    Dawna: Small segment will find us because of their own interest. When Society had $ they did good things, but couldn't get the message out, it's a 30 year old problem

    Alice: limited audience but positive experiences. As It Was for example, limited audience

    Al: Biggest enemy is phones, electronics

    Nancy: 100,000 visitors to museum per year before television, which caused a big drop

    Linda: Social media

     

     

  • They don't know much and think we have no funds.

  • Attendees: Ron Brown, Stephanie Butler, Larry Mullaly, Kira Lesley, Carolyn Kingsnorth, Phil Long, Robert Hamilton, Gretchen Hamilton, Gayle Lewis, Jeff LaLande, Pat Harper, Andrea Patterson, Jack Patterson.

    Has Windows in Time attendance increased?
    Larry: Yes, but other events haven't, eg Living History Days

    Gretchen: Under previous management of SOHS, people dropped memberships

    Andrea: Agreed it wasn't managed well

    Jeff: Rural parts of Jackson County show residual resentment toward SOHS, not deserved

    Jack: Vote gave perception it was an open-ended tax and people distrust government, assumed the tax would increase. Another perception is that SOHS does great work with artifacts and history, but they want it for free

    Stephanie: At museum in J'ville people resented the fees because at one time admission was free

    Gayle: Perception of "old people talking about old stuff". Most don't give SOHS much thought, it isn't visible enough

    Carolyn: we need to get tax funding back from the county because they are still collecting the historical district tax.

    Stephanie's notes:

    Community Perception: previous management. People dropped their memberships because
    they felt SOHS was not managed well and it is a hard perception to get away from. Rural
    communities tend to hold onto negativity toward the more economically wealthy areas of the
    community. Some people distrusted the last ballot measure and that it would rise above the
    initial 5 cents to 25 cents in a short course of time. The other perception is that Jackson County
    residents used to be admitted to the museums for free and there is still some residual bad
    feeling that is no longer the case. Many people don’t have a good idea of what we do. Some
    residents still want to know why we are not getting the levy funds, even though the county is
    still collecting it.
  • Present: Phil Long, Billie Taylor, Alice Mullaly, Hew McElroy, Bill Gates, Hazel Smith

    Hazel: People don't know SOHS

    Billie: Not a strong presence

    Hew: Problems of SOHS

    Billie: People think we mismanaged so funds were taken away

    Bill: we have obligations but no more funding stream

    Hazel: People who use public library don't know there is a collaboration

    Phil: Logo in library. People either don't know or heard from those who rememeber negative 

     

  • Present: Alice Mullaly, Linda Turner, Doug McGeary, Hazel Smith, Kevin Keating, Vicki Bryden, Carol Holst, Monte Holst, Pat Harper

    VB: Still idea out there that SOHS wasted money

    LT: Came back to this area so I'm not aware of that belief

    HS: They don't kow much about the society. SHow the PowerPoint at the airport, other locations

    KK: Man on the street would say, "What? Where?

    CH: People hope to find a museum when they come to the Archives

    MH: This building is in a good location

    VG: Hanley Farm great but seasonal

    LT: Lots of emphasis and money to Hanley, not to collections

    DM: Smithsonian has so much to attract visitors

    HS: Display at the mall were successful, but we have no $ for them now. The farm tour (other farms, not HF) had a lot of sponsors

    VB: People at the mall exhibits didn't know about SOHS

    Pat: No one who visited the mall exhibits offered to be sponsors (and we didn't ask)

    DM: Too secluded? 

    LT: Do we need such a qualified curator? Sometimes we strangle ourselves with rules. Would rather have a dress she donated be worn and used than have it locked away in storage

    MH: Can we train volunteers in curatorial practices?
    PH: We are a professional society, follow museum ethics

    CH: More exposure for the good things we already do is important

    VB: Had a book signing with Bill Miller in the Library, 3 people came

    HS: We need knowledge, effort and expertise, our mission is to preserve, protect and share

    KK: could hold a quarterly event with wine, etc. Request donations, show artifacts, get sponsors 

  • Participants were Larry Mullaly (Moderator), Paden Voget, Sharon Feil, Greg Applen, Pam Sasseen, Ron Hillers, Jerry Doran, Judith Meuser, Doug Loughdal (FNC), Kristen Galabrun (FNC), Pam Sasseen, Rocky Wales, Rhonda Nowak, Tam Moore; Isaiah Webb.

    1. Opportunity to look at the past and enable us to not make decisions that would be detrimental to our future;
    2. Good for the newer generation to learn about old ways;
    3. Good for people to learn about the history of the area, especially when few are from this area;
    4. One way to attract people to come to the area and tourism; and
    5. Informs people of the roots and history of the region.
    6. Many people, especially young people are not interested in history taught in the old-fashioned way;
    7. Families may not be interested in the historic aspect of the farm but like it as a pastoral place to bring their children and as an escape from the urban environment; and
    8. Dwindling volunteers.

     

     

     

  • Bill Maentz, Carolyn Kingsnorth, Bill Gates, Pam Sasseen, Pat Harper, Doug McGeary, Liz Koester, Doug Sasseen, Sue Musolf, and 5 guests attended

    “Where is the money? Why was it wasted?” was one of the first comments, referring to the closure of the museum when county funds for the Society discontinued. And, regarding early museum leadership, member perception was “all you want is money.”  There is lingering negativism to overcome. It was also noted that our presence is not known to the general public, “Where is it? Where’s the museum?”

     

  • Attending: Doris and Lynn Sjolund, Valerie Root, Barbara Moore, Jennifer Laughlin, David Sours, Al Minnick, Sheila Baker, Doug Mc Geary, Cyndi Noyes, Larry Mullaly (Moderator), Alice Mullaly (recorder)

    1. Perceptions:

    LS—positive about SOHS, but not enough to pay for it

    DS—most people don’t know about it

    JL—election was 60% no and 40% yes

    SB—constant reminders needed to get perception of SOHS off of flat line

    Who will pay—we’re stretched?

     

    DS—people are surprised we are all volunteers. People would be impressed by the video if shown in friend’s living rooms. Should be available to watch on the web.

    CN—yes, have it available for house presentations

    DS—show at a manor talk

     

     

  • What do you think is the community perception of Southern Oregon Historical Society - I don't know if many people think about it. I don't see it talked about or written about. I don't see it out in the community. I don't know if people understand the region you are keeping history on. 

  • Community Conversations Ashland Public Library August 22, 2018

    Attending: Linda Walker-Turner, Larry Mullaly, Sam Whitford, Dennis Powers, Mary Jane Cedar Face, Mary O’Kief, Mollie, Owens, Ben Truwe, Phil Long, Bill Gates, Dick Thierolf, Susan Kiefer, George Kramer, Alice Mullaly, Doug Mc Geary

    DT—People value in part in that they want to know people care about history. Society paid for a major survey in 2007 that said SOHS would lose in an election. With the exception of volunteers, the community cannot seem to appreciate SOHS. They cannot see who we are.

                MOK—Look at RVTD and their recent win. It can be done.

                MO—Community cares about who they are. What pulls all together is our common heritage. Parents think the programs and educational efforts are important. People who marry and have parties at Hanley Farm think it is important. How do you build on these numbers?

                MO—Would be a loss to the community is SOHS were not there.

                GK—Perception—“bunch of old white folks”. Audience today is 4th graders and retired folks. Bring in other cultures and folks in the middle.

                MJCF—There are so many urgent needs. Look how agriculture is changing—wheat to fruit to marijuana—make presentations dynamic

                DT—SOU and SOHS had arguments over Britt negatives

                PL—Reality of scarcity of resources requires partnerships not adversarial positions.

     

  • Moderated by Doug McGeary, attended by: Tim Balfour; Anne Billeter; Eli Mathews; Bob Hackett; Todd Kepple; Doy and Rick Towsley; Dick Gordon; Amy Drake; Chris Sanz; Aaron Hoefling; Ben Truwe; Sheila Baker; Doug McGeary; Linda Turner; Pam and Doug Sasseen; Pat Harper



    pam s I heard, "what happened to all the money?" SOHS needs to overcome
    anne b Anne doesn't hear as much negativity as she did when the cuts occurred. People who resent they donated maerials that are not available to the public
    anne b Make a way to make collection more accessible, but it's a huge amount of work. Properly done, has a huge effect on visitors
    US Bank Many perceptions, "archive of information and artifacts"; SOHS trying to be current and interactive. Everyone thinks history is valuable until asked to pay for it. Don't have solution, but It's the perception, value for the idea but not wil to pay for it
    pam s IT would be a very little tax, only a few cents
    TK Tax-supported museum in Klamath, suffered cutbacks, threats. Prominent leaders came forward, small motel tax increase. In 2011, tried for a temporary levy. Library had gone for a 3 year levy that passed (then they were able to pass a library district). So, museum passed a 3 year levy in 2011, then a 5 year levy in 2014. Hope for a district, one commissioner opposed it, going for a 5 year levy this November. One issue came up. One Commssioner who opposed cited the law about heritage districts that would allow a heritage district to take 21 million. 
    ? "Enigma" People know SOHS exists, don't know purpose and function
    anne b How we market it, what would people get for their money? Preserving doesn't inspire; events and exhibits
    amy "Confusion" - great memories of Jacksonville Museum, not much since then; others had no idea we had a functioning organization; since 2016 general attitude is concern if people are aware, they want good news, look forward to what we could become.
    Sanz In my work with donors there isn't interest in giving to SOHS, may be aware but not interested in giving gifts; maybe they aren't sure it's strong enough to be around. Takes a differnet person to want to preserve history
    KFALLS man Have to appeal to wider groups. KF is going to hire person to go into schools

     

  • Ann Root, Mike Burrill, Carolyn Burrill, Ben Truwe, Hew MCElroy, Larry Smith, Carolyn Kingsnorth, Chelsea Rose, Chris Walker, Linda Turner, Phil Long, Pat Harper

    Chelsea – city council asked how we will add to vitality of downtown

    Ann – Was the membership larger in 2007? Lost interest since lost funding. Saw huge support in community

    Chelsea-great quarterly is back

    CK-museum gave visibility even though use was low

    Mike B- unfortunate , loss of levy was about government, not about history.

    Chris-might have passed when library passed

    Phil – polling said it would pass

    Mike-obligated to general sharing, whether or not people can support

    Chris-educate, targeted marketing campaign

    Carolyn – people have been taught history as names, dates, how do you get them to come 1st time so you can interest them with stories?

    Larry- WIndows in Time is great

    Chelsea-time is bad. SOHS has done some great stuff – Hist made by you, exhibits in mall, but didn’t translate into financial security.

    Phil – Klamath county has passed a levy, suggests some perceptions are working against us. Is that due to past?

    Ann-SOHS appears unorganized, not connected, fragmented, we don’t take advantage of opportunities. Too many nonprofits fighting for dollars, Why put $ in when assets aren’t shared. Not a machine that works. It’s just going down the drain.  Ultimately could get support

    CHELSEA- doesn’t seem like there was a plan. We sent out a letter that said we don’t have a plan B, that was very disappointing.

    Mike – we did have a plan B, and he was surprised to hear we didn't

    Phil – we didn’t talk about Plan B because it sounded likea threat

    Chelsea- that was the wrong message. You once had millions, why wasn’t there a savings account?

    Phil-there were actions that were harmful. Strategy after that was to ask county for handouts.

    Chris- counties have done same thing, no rainy day fund and then lost funding.

    Chelsea-Douglas County is in trouble, too. I’ve also wondered about Klamath County. Todd is one reason they are successful. Having an ED might be invaluable. We need to rebrand. New logo? Heard at City Council, “I thought Kid Time was Historical Society, not the “boring old place next door.” Too bad Kid Time isn’t a team player because they could help our image.

    Chris – County Clerk outsources archives (county records). Has some archival materials in their office.

    Chelsea – maybe we’d be able to get Carnegie if kid time doesn’t

    Phil- SOHS position is Kid Time has been good tenant, decision was made.

    Ann – strategy to pick up Carnegie if Kid Time fails?

    Chris – City council thought KT had better fiscal plan

    CHELSEA- more about that fact we couldn’t make downtown vital. Why didn’t KT  make it more apparent that when they moved in they were using SOHS exhibit materials?

     

  • Doug McGeary (SOHS President) Susan Walsh (Provost & Vice President for Academic Affairs            Sue Densmore (Communications Consultant) Ron Kramer (past Executive Director of Oregon Public Radio) Dr. Lee Murdock (Pediatrician, Family Nurturing Center Board) Ken Gregg  (Jacksonville Councilman) Lindsay Berryman (past Medford Mayor, Heart of Medford Association) Jeff LaLande (SOHS) Linda Turner (SOHS)  Vicki Ann Bryden (SOHS) Sheila Baker (SOHS) Alice Mullaly (SOHS) Larry Mullaly (SOHS

    • Lindsay Berryman:  “Who?” is an attitude of many. Others recall SOHS for its protracted struggle with the County. The money is in the hills not in downtown Medford.
    • Sue Densmore: Every non-profit community society struggles as you do for donors and supporters. All have a role to play, but there is variety of ways in how they obtain funding.
    • Ron Kramer: Many people have no perception of SOHS. It is important that the society not concentrate only on Medford. It once had a museum in Ashland, and when this closed it ended a valuable link with that community. SOHS needs to see itself as representing Southern Oregon in a broad scale. You need to spread your wings and be a catalyst for regional cooperative efforts involving other societies such as Curry, Coos, and Klamath. Going big is how larger sponsors are brought into things.
    • Ken Green: You need to change public perception that you are insular in your thinking and doing so by emphasizing collaboration.
    • Dr. Lee Murdock:  Offer talks in the schools like Larry Smith does. Communication is everything.
    • Susan Walsh: Recounted how she signed up for a $100 membership and then received no communication for a year, and the first thing she received was a renewal notice.
    • Jeff LaLande:  We will work to resolve this, and extend a membership to you at no cost for the coming year.
    • Lindsay Berryman: SOHS is not visible to the community, you need things that draw people in.
    • Sue Densmore:   In previous years, there seemed to an arrogance to the society, a sense that it had what it needed, and did not have to share with others. Now you are in a very different situation, and have to reach out.
    • Ron Kramer:  It is hard to bring people in and make them care without exhibit space. You then need press releases, newspaper coverage. Windows in Time is great.  But you need some kind of Junior Windows in Time to present to middle school students. Would be good if you could partner in some kind of community wide event, an anniversary of some kind.
  • Attending: Sue Kupillas, Mary Anne Pitcher, Ben Truwe, Larry Mullaly, Doug McGeary, moderator, Alice Mullaly, note taker

    SK—SOHS was a very exclusive society. Sam Wagner was arrogant. SOHS only invested in Jacksonville. Needs to focus on all the county.

    No longer perceived as arrogant

    There is so much going on now, people don’t even know about SOHS

    Visibility not there except for Hanley

     

    DM—Perceptions are important

     

    LM—Hanley stages events there, can do same with History Center

     

    DM—or build a new building

     

    SK—Kid time has done well there

     

     

Question 3: What role do you think regional history should play in education?

  • Linda: are public school teachers involved? HIstory Day?

    Dawna: History Day is state and national, with local competitions that lead to state, etc.

    Tam: OHS trying to keep it alive, only 3 schools competed this year in our area

    Dawna: If we are involved, link history "beyond the mountain" - all history is local

    History day really gave us links to teacher all over the valley. The winners of history day went on to the State competition and then on to the Nationals. This is still a great learning tool that is still held in many parts of the country.

    Liz: Impact of World War 1

    Dawna said we had a “traveling trunks” program that she would take to many of the valley schools to teach the students about pioneer days or Indian lives. Al said all these things connect students to the larger world.

    Trevor: OR and WA vineyeards are growing, history of wine important

    Linda: That could be History Made by You exhibit

    Al: Teacher 10 years, needed help with connecting general histroy to local

    Dawna: Traveling trunk program was active twice, addressed that need

    Al: SOHS should go to Medford School Board about partnering with them

    Pat: We are doing all we can do right now and will not be able to do more until we have money and financially stability.

    Linda: Involve interns, local Audubon Society has an internship program for young students.

    Doug: Should we be central to education? Should we focus on tourism? Economic Development?

    Peter: Interns do podcasts and videos, use them to promote SOHS.

     

     

  • Very important, should be in the curriculum for more than just fourth grade.

  • Attendees: Ron Brown, Stephanie Butler, Larry Mullaly, Kira Lesley, Carolyn Kingsnorth, Phil Long, Robert Hamilton, Gretchen Hamilton, Gayle Lewis, Jeff LaLande, Pat Harper, Andrea Patterson, Jack Patterson.

    Jack: By education, do we mean public schools, priacte? If it's schools, we can't add to teachers' burden, but we need to educate teachers, they can bring history into their classrooms

    Ron: Used to be a traveling show for schools. We could offer guest speakers

    Jeff: Southern Oregon Education Services District used to sponsor outside speakers

    Stephanie: SOHS had a robust program in the past.

    Jeff: Windows in Time and other speakers are education, be sure they toot SOHS's horn

    Stephanie's notes:

    The critical piece is educating the teachers about Southern Oregon’s history. There are always
    opportunities to bring local history into a curriculum and teachers don’t have the opportunity to
    learn it. (we need professional development opportunities for teachers). Any time that we can
    offer programs in the schools we should do it. We provide pre and post activities for the
    teachers. Revive the robust school outreach programs and the Speakers Bureau.

     

  • Present: Phil Long, Billie Taylor, Alice Mullaly, Hew McElroy, Bill Gates, Hazel Smith

    Hazel: Draw more entities

    Billie: Open house for teachers

    Hazel: Mandated curriculum

    Bill: Let districts know what is there

    Hew: Get on certification renewal hours

    Phil: SOESD or SOU can give hours PDU

    Hazel: Essay contest in fall with scholarship

    Bill: HIstory days, scholarship offered there

    Phil: Standas based education, Native American 6th grade; Oregon 4th grade; Americna History 7th and 8th

    Hazel: Retired teachers can help

     

  • Present: Alice Mullaly, Linda Turner, Doug McGeary, Hazel Smith, Kevin Keating, Vicki Bryden, Carol Holst, Monte Holst, Pat Harper

    LT: We need a facility for classes to visit

    VB: Had exhibits in the History Center in the past, classes, hands-on. Teachers used to be able to borrow history boxes statewide. Also trunks, "Kids' Kits". Could we do that outreach?

    HS: Offer professional development credits for teachers

    CH: Are there still design and arts classes? Could students research ideas for exhibits?

    DM: Different levels of education and accreditation. Different levels of expertise required to pull together a program

    LT: We need to catch kids early

    CH: Kid Time is supposed to be a children's museum

    KK: Local history standards exist for various educational levels

    HS: Sixth grade studies ancient cultures...

    PH: Any income potential in such programs?

    DM: What about other audiences aside from education? Tourism? Research? SOHS Could go different ways

    LT: School District could pay for kits?

    DM: Contractual relationship with schools? 

  • Participants were Larry Mullaly (Moderator), Paden Voget, Sharon Feil, Greg Applen, Pam Sasseen, Ron Hillers, Jerry Doran, Judith Meuser, Doug Loughdal (FNC), Kristen Galabrun (FNC), Pam Sasseen, Rocky Wales, Rhonda Nowak, Tam Moore; Isaiah Webb.

    1. Connecting kids to local history gives them interest in history in general;
    2. Giving kids in their own history builds curiosity;
    3. Regional history is an important part in early grade level curriculum in our school district and the 4th grade program helps integrating local history into the local schools;
    4. Promoting the 4th grade program even further would be a good way to involve a larger cross-section of the local community;
    5. Having archaeological demonstrations with children is a good way to connect;
    6. Programs such as the Farm to School program that brings children and families to the farm to learn about where their food comes from and cooking is a great way to connect with children;
    7. Gardening with kids is a good way to get kids out and as an entry into living history; and
    8. Education of families in healthy food.
  • Bill Maentz, Carolyn Kingsnorth, Bill Gates, Pam Sasseen, Pat Harper, Doug McGeary, Liz Koester, Doug Sasseen, Sue Musolf, and 5 guests attended

    It was suggested that stories should be shared about local history. “People need to be intrigued, enticed to think about history.” A physical location, such as we had with the Jacksonville Courthouse, is needed for children to visit as part of their field-trip curriculum. “Children don’t know about Southern Oregon’s rich history because it’s not taught in local schools.” It was suggested we reach out to schools, visit, teach them about local history; become part of the schools’ curriculum. It was noted the school Superintendent wants to bring history back as part of new courses. The “Windows in Time” series was discussed. It was suggested the series be expanded to include evening (and/or weekend) presentations to reach a wider audience, such as those who work. “The Society needs to tell a story – no matter the audience. Transplants need to be informed. How do we do this? Personal contact – take the story to the people.”

     

  • Attending: Doris and Lynn Sjolund, Valerie Root, Barbara Moore, Jennifer Laughlin, David Sours, Al Minnick, Sheila Baker, Doug Mc Geary, Cyndi Noyes, Larry Mullaly (Moderator), Alice Mullaly (recorder)

    Education

    DM—tourism, not just children as meaning of education

    LM—needs support from corporate entities

    DS—visitor’s bureau needs video and cards of events

    JL—Pat connected to Chamber of Commerce lately. That is important

    DS—talked about the value of the Heritage Association (dozen local museums) having a scavenger hunt. Also great farm to table dinners we had for awhile, with great talk on relevant issue and artifacts. Link our artifacts of other things.

    LM—SOHS is very anglo centric—might tap into Hispanic community

    CN—do lots of collaboration

    DM—history is vital to education—the more worked in in relevant ways make our community better

    AlM—History is hard to convey to people. Need to place content in context.

    Must think outside the box—suitcase exhibits, focus on images. SOHS seems fragmented now. There seems to be an arrogance about the some in the society.

    Need champion/partner with a face—library

     

     

  • What role do you think regional history should play in education? When I was a kid I was forced into taking a state history class as a requirement to graduate. It was my favorite class. You got to touch things and learn about the Oregon Trail and the folk songs and people. 

  • Community Conversations Ashland Public Library August 22, 2018

    Attending: Linda Walker-Turner, Larry Mullaly, Sam Whitford, Dennis Powers, Mary Jane Cedar Face, Mary O’Kief, Mollie, Owens, Ben Truwe, Phil Long, Bill Gates, Dick Thierolf, Susan Kiefer, George Kramer, Alice Mullaly, Doug Mc Geary

    SK—Teach kids about history

                MJCF—active learning that is fun

                MOK—Thematic exhibits in an exhibit hall appealing to all levels like at Hanley Farm

                MO—Children’s Museum is missed, have exhibits in the community

                GK—farm implements in barn at Hanley should be an exhibit. Divide Penny’s space so can have rentals and exhibits. Ashland walking tours.

                SW—walking tours for tourists—once SOHS was in the Swendenberg House, and looked at old rectory at Trinity as a possible satellite museum.

                GK—Ashland Heritage Committee. Have exhibits at Winburn Way and it is the starting place for walking tours.

                BT—How to we get and manage volunteers.

                DP—How do you get people to come

                GK—promote with flyers and articles.

                DP—need total focus for each type of media to get the word out

    Now it is a piecemeal approach. Get connections. There needs to be a group that works on this. For example, take your three best salespersons and set up a meeting with Rosebud media.. It is locally owned. Ask for help and we can do for them.

                MO—I struggle as a volunteer with not stepping on toes. People are invested in their own piece and get mad if they get stepped on. Hire a digital media expert. Pull together a plan and get info out.

                Make an OLLI connection and have exhibits at First Friday Art Walks

     

  • Moderated by Doug McGeary, attended by: Tim Balfour; Anne Billeter; Eli Mathews; Bob Hackett; Todd Kepple; Doy and Rick Towsley; Dick Gordon; Amy Drake; Chris Sanz; Aaron Hoefling; Ben Truwe; Sheila Baker; Doug McGeary; Linda Turner; Pam and Doug Sasseen; Pat Harper



    doug of course history is important to education, how does it tie into tourism? What role does history play in other areas?
    ? Education meansschool, are you tryingto break out of that box?
    anne b Photographs in wider community; all the museums do have a role in education, used to do it really well. Trunks that went out to teachers. CHF doesn't reach all fourth graders. Potential for OLLIE, is there a way we can take higher education and offer internships?
    pam s Volunteers and manpower are limited. 
    Sanz Even small projects matter. They have photos on wall put up by interns, people view them even when they are in a hurry
    amy Lane Co Hist Society had reproduced photos and put them near where the photo had been taken - creates growing interest.
    TK Facebook page - K Falls don't use it for announcements. Select photo of the week, submit to local paper, published on Sunday in both places, with more info on Facebook page. 
    TK 5700 people follow them on Facebook. It's relevant, they don't have to work at it.
    pam s Will give more info on Hanley Farm Facebook page
    US Bank Today's world is in bite-size chunks. I say an 8 minute video and wouldn't support it until they cut to 2 minutes. Reach people with short attention spans. 
    TK When I select photo of the week, I like really old photos, but more attention isgivento photos from last 50 years - far more popular
    ? Be a resource for variety of people
    ? Have to do it all, Facebook, Twitter, etc. For younger people you have to hit with multiple impressions; we have 100s of decisions a day
      How are we articulating value?
      Culinary programs are big in schools, connect to that and other trends
    Julie History made by you exhibits drew people. Some students from Butte Falls had written some of the info so they came down to see it. They were interested in electronic typewriters (what's that?)
    Doug If we can provide content and get more people to visit libraries, that's good. 
    Linda Frustrated because we have collection but not space to show them
    Julie Library would like to do more but need space, too. People stop and view a map they have.
    pam s 60s Exhibit was fun to promote
    anne b Exhibit cases in schools

     

  • Ann Root, Mike Burrill, Carolyn Burrill, Ben Truwe, Hew MCElroy, Larry Smith, Carolyn Kingsnorth, Chelsea Rose, Chris Walker, Linda Turner, Phil Long, Pat Harper

    Chris - Start a program at each school

    Larry – get grants for that

    Chelsea - $ through Oregon Heritage to get kids there

    Linda – we have heard trunks are important

    Mike – music in the mornings – Britt, in elementary schools

    CK – dropping because schools need to tie everything to curriculum

    Larry- outdoor school at Hanley Farm, easy grant

    Chris – do we have a grant writer?

    Carolyn – tried to take program into elementary school, but CK would have to show how it would fulfill standards

    Ann – tie story to something to event over weekend, play the recording in schools

     

  • Doug McGeary (SOHS President) Susan Walsh (Provost & Vice President for Academic Affairs            Sue Densmore (Communications Consultant) Ron Kramer (past Executive Director of Oregon Public Radio) Dr. Lee Murdock (Pediatrician, Family Nurturing Center Board) Ken Gregg  (Jacksonville Councilman) Lindsay Berryman (past Medford Mayor, Heart of Medford Association) Jeff LaLande (SOHS) Linda Turner (SOHS)  Vicki Ann Bryden (SOHS) Sheila Baker (SOHS) Alice Mullaly (SOHS) Larry Mullaly (SOHS

    • Lindsay Berryman:  You need to reference things that happened in specific places to make them seem real to students.
    • Ken Gregg: Regional history provides shared experiences and teaches us about the human condition.  A local museum has its own kind of impact.
    • Dr. Lee Murdock:  There is a value of taking a class to a site where something significant happened.

     

  • Attending: Sue Kupillas, Mary Anne Pitcher, Ben Truwe, Larry Mullaly, Doug McGeary, moderator, Alice Mullaly, note taker

     

    MP—Butte Creek Mill working with others like the school district and tribes to develop curriculum, history, mechanical, and environmental.

    Older kids will serve internships to learn hands-on skills.

    Work with superintendent

     

    SK—Work with Cow Creeks and use some of their curriculum

    Focus once a month on native people’s stories

     

    MP—reached out to partners in development side

    Symphony donates to music in schools for example

     

    SK—History Trunks in Schools really worked well.

     

    DM—Interpretive Center with engaged and active learning opportunities

     

    AM--Example: Ask Penny’s to sponsor a sample interpretive room on fashion. Display some of SOHS fashion collection. Include dress-up clothes and photo opportunity. Have photos of people wearing different fashion (from our collection) and have people try to match the photos with the artifact as to time period and talk about why they made that decision.

     

    MP—Need event venues that display some of the collection—way to make money on exhibits.

    Stop hoarding collection

Question 4: We have the second largest history collection in Oregon; how should we share it with the public?

  • Liz: we are sharing at Hanley Farm

    Larry: Had 3 (guns?) at Hanley Farm during Living History Days. A lot of money is needed to care for collection.

    Billie: People thin SOHS is just Hanley Farm, don't know about artifacts

    Peter: Unpaid people created the History Made By You exhibits (with staff assistance and coordination). Airport was a good location. we needed volunteers to contact teachers and do more with the “history by you”

    Dawna: Goal should be permanent exhibit venue where exhibits can remain for a few years, not just a few months

    Tam: Never say, "we have always done it that way." We need to share artifacts with public, with other museums, we need professionals. It could be done by a fewpassionate people. These passionate people could also raise the money we need for SOHS. The County shut down the Library, but it ran.

    Doug: w how do we share our artifacts with the volunteers we have now.

    Linda:collections are our problem since it takes so much money to keep them! 

    Billie: our main concern is to make people know we exist. Question five: Where does SOHS go from here.

     

     

     

     

  • More mini displays around our region, i.e. orchard display at Harry & David, costumes in Ashland, airplane pictures at the airport.

  • Attendees: Ron Brown, Stephanie Butler, Larry Mullaly, Kira Lesley, Carolyn Kingsnorth, Phil Long, Robert Hamilton, Gretchen Hamilton, Gayle Lewis, Jeff LaLande, Pat Harper, Andrea Patterson, Jack Patterson.

    Jack: Continue what we do (but he thought that we were still having History Made By You exhibits)

    Jeff: Search for grants for rotating exhibits

    Gretchen: What is the main cost of exhibits? Space?

    Larry: curatorial staff

    Ben: Staffing with volunteers is tough, we had to use paid staff

    Andrea: Is a museum unattainable? It would be the ideal.

    Phil: Why is a museum ideal? 

    Jeff: In a 6 state region, Jackson County is the richest but the only one without a museum

    Ben: Museum would cost millions, but it is doable

    Pat: We need a vision, what would be the best location for a museum?

    Jeff: Medford. Rest of the county would not support a museum in Ashland, we need the population and wealth base in Medford

    Jack: Loss of Carnegie was a tragedy

    Phil: Lost Creek museum shows "a snippet" of local history. We could outreach to small museums

    Andrea: Mentioned Hanley, also property next to Genealogy Library for sale, would be a good location

    Stephanie's notes:

    How to share the Collections with the public: Continue taking artifacts out to the community in
    smaller traveling exhibits because we have no museum. Start an aggressive campaign for grants
    that will pay for rotating traveling exhibits on a two-year rotation to help keep us visible and
    headed toward the goal of bringing back a museum. The issue of staffing exhibits is also
    important because we have had to rely on volunteers and to supplement with paid help to cover
    when there are holes to fill. It’s about stories and accessing any collection or museum is
    centered on those stories. We have a past and we are at a crossroads so what is the value of
    connecting people and the community with those artifacts and to give them access to both the
    things and the stories. We are the wealthiest county in the region and the only one that does
    not have an historic museum. It will be very difficult to build a museum until SOHS is no longer
    invisible and until the bad blood from the past can be dealt with. Pat asked if we were going to
    have a museum, where would it be? Jeff feels that Medford would be the best place where we
    could get the most support from communities around us.

     

  • Present: Phil Long, Billie Taylor, Alice Mullaly, Hew McElroy, Bill Gates, Hazel Smith

    Hew: traveling cases are in storage

    Billie: Need curator to set up exhibits

    HEw: No venue or curator for big exhibits but small ones we should look at telling stories

    Billie: Education collection yes

    Hazel: nice windows to use

    Hew: History of aviation at airport

    Hazel: working on box of photos on Sterling mine and forestry

    Hew: RR show exhibit

    Billie: Windows to advertize or events. Cemeteries in windoes. Try to bring people to Medford

    Bill: Museum complex here

    Hazel: Parking problems

    Hew: MEdford not friendly

    Billie: 2 hour parking not enough

    Hazel: Warn visitors about parking all the time

    Phil: Begin with micro places

    Billie: Mall, library

    Bill: Fire truck as marketing tool

    Billie: People took their time in the mall exhibits

    Hew: Not strong selling of Heritage District, get info out

    Hazel: Look for partners

    Phil: Remember audience must be able to get to exhibit. Centraly High School and LIbrary

    Hew: Interent presence, outstanding logo

    Hazel: PHotos are easy to pull up, artifacts are not

    Phil: ?? can craft a set of photos for a story line

    Online and ? Spaces can be anywhere

    Billie: Story with photos, movement is attractive

    Bill: Airport is open to exhibit

    Hazel: SHow people where they can go, Chamber of Commerce

    Bill: Bottleneck is curatorial access, Stephanie cannot (assume he meant she cannot handle all the responsibilities of a curator when she is a volunteer and works)

     

     

  • Present: Alice Mullaly, Linda Turner, Doug McGeary, Hazel Smith, Kevin Keating, Vicki Bryden, Carol Holst, Monte Holst, Pat Harper

    VB: Need museum, space and staff

    LT: Need space

    MH: The Carnegie wasn't ideal, the park next door is a distraction, no parking

    DM: Kid Time should be out of History Center in 2019, but they have an option to extend

    DM: Different ways to share, from website access to full blown museum. What would public like to view? 

    HS: They're happy as long as they don't have to pay

    PH: We have an online catalog with photos of artifacts, but people don't know that

    Everyone: Could show videos, DMV, airport, waiting rooms

    VG: We History Made By You cases

    LT: Holly theatre has spare rooms. What about Craterian? LIbraries? TRaveling exhibits are expensive to create, move and display

    DM: If we set priorities and make firm decisions we can make them happen

    MH: Videos about SOHS at Hanley Farm?

    DM: Where is our will?

    CH: Maybe we can increase visibility

    KK: WIT lectures, give 4 at once at major event, serve food, ask for money

     

  • Participants were Larry Mullaly (Moderator), Paden Voget, Sharon Feil, Greg Applen, Pam Sasseen, Ron Hillers, Jerry Doran, Judith Meuser, Doug Loughdal (FNC), Kristen Galabrun (FNC), Pam Sasseen, Rocky Wales, Rhonda Nowak, Tam Moore; Isaiah Webb.

     

    1. Opening up an accessible display/museum;
    2. Convert a barn to a museum (likely cost prohibitive as well as restrictions to modifications to historic buildings);
    3. Portable displays given enough resources;
    4. Displays in public schools; and
    5. Bring “props” to schools.

     

  • Bill Maentz, Carolyn Kingsnorth, Bill Gates, Pam Sasseen, Pat Harper, Doug McGeary, Liz Koester, Doug Sasseen, Sue Musolf, and 5 guests attended

    It was noted that partnerships, such as the one we are forming with the City of Central Point Parks & Recreation, need to be pursued, partnerships that will allow us to “get support to share artifacts with our community.”  “We need to find groups who want to show these artifacts and take responsibility.” It was suggested we “loosen our restrictions” (if possible) regarding artifacts, and exhibit in libraries, and like facilities, as we had in the past. It was also suggested we hold public exhibits, such as the “1960’s” exhibit we held in the Woolworth Building a few years ago. Another suggestion was to offer tours of the White City facility, where the artifacts are currently stored. “The best way to get collections out are exhibits, all done in partnerships,” until we get a “real museum.”

     

     

  • Attending: Doris and Lynn Sjolund, Valerie Root, Barbara Moore, Jennifer Laughlin, David Sours, Al Minnick, Sheila Baker, Doug Mc Geary, Cyndi Noyes, Larry Mullaly (Moderator), Alice Mullaly (recorder)

    VR—traveling exhibits—we have all the case

    LM—need person to prepare exhibits and have no current plan

    VR—have a museum truck with exhibit inside to go to where people are—schools, farmer’s markets, fairs and events.

    LM—mission to protect artifacts if very strong.

    DM—so valuable to show artifacts—must figure out how to pay for getting items out

    CN—most people think of a museum and physical objects rather than paper items

    LM—An idea as we transition from Kid Time use of this building is to construct a model module of an interpretive center that we can show people something tangible about how a new area might look—for example a room sized interpretive space might have artifacts on exhibit with explanations, a hands-on activity to do related to the artifacts, and a school program that could accommodate a class with a core curriculum goal in mind all related to the exhibit.

    DS—I really like the truck museum idea. And talks could have artifacts with them like the OHS head had when he came here last year.

    DS—Cemetery tours in Jacksonville sell out immediately. Interpretive center or truck could have historic reenactors

    CN—need kids events here to replace Kid Time while people still think of coming here for activities

    VR—how do we get volunteers, especially younger people

    DS—That is a problem everywhere

    LM—We must be willing to make mistakes as we try things and move on from them.

    SB—multimedia presentations that lead people through a story are effective

     

     

  • Community Conversations Ashland Public Library August 22, 2018

    Attending: Linda Walker-Turner, Larry Mullaly, Sam Whitford, Dennis Powers, Mary Jane Cedar Face, Mary O’Kief, Mollie, Owens, Ben Truwe, Phil Long, Bill Gates, Dick Thierolf, Susan Kiefer, George Kramer, Alice Mullaly, Doug Mc Geary

    MJCF—deaccession some items to pay for getting others on exhibit.

                SK—have a place and traveling stuff

                LM—Todd Kepple at Klamath Museum said recently if he had it to do again he would not just display a lot of stuff, but would have interactive exhibits at lots of locations.

                GK—digital media is content and that is what SOHS has. Go to a medical center for example and volunteer to decorate their lobby with exhibits.

                DT—RCC and SOU We could have a base in those schools. Concerns about preservation causes an impediment to exhibits from staff.

               MOK—described a tenth anniversary exhibit for Table Rock Campus of RCC that was done by a volunteer without artifacts that was very effective.

                BT—Any of these ideas require staff and money

     

  • Moderated by Doug McGeary, attended by: Tim Balfour; Anne Billeter; Eli Mathews; Bob Hackett; Todd Kepple; Doy and Rick Towsley; Dick Gordon; Amy Drake; Chris Sanz; Aaron Hoefling; Ben Truwe; Sheila Baker; Doug McGeary; Linda Turner; Pam and Doug Sasseen; Pat Harper





    Pat and how can we share the collection without additional financial resources?
    ? Inform and educate the community about the collection so they understand what we have to share
    US Bank I can't answer because I don't know what you have
    Linda Do we continue to accept donations when we can't share and don't have space? Once the materials go elsewhere, we can't get them 
    TK 3 cars in KFAlls collection, 1904 Oldsmobile; 1919; 1967 Mustang gets most attention
    TK Admire work of SOHS as volunteers; Kernan and As IT Was; Tam Moore's effort into bond measure. Encourages us to go for a museum, tell the community we want to get back on track. Word museum still has staying power, get something open.
    Dick I don't know how important artifacts are, at least in quantity. It was more about how you build a teepee, how do I make a necklace of beads? Families are looking for adventure, activities, enable participation.
    Tim B Travel tourism, retailers. People wantto engage in an experience. Partner with private entity that wants to create a business. EG gold panning with grandkids
    Tim B People still want to see the museum that was here 30 years ago (no one can survive on people coming back every 30 years)
    pam s More emphasis on living history at HF? Hands-on history
    amy SOHS is sharing the collection at HF, those artifacts are available to the publilc. Marketing opportunity
    US Bank Has mission of SOHS changed recently?  How did we become the largest collection? 
    doug history was that we had public support with funds that allowed collecting, especially Jacksonville
    doug SOHS once had power and presence, a $2 million budget
    doug Businesses might want to display materials (mentioned Dorland paintings at OCF)
    Sheila Good point about mission - support it or change it
    D Sasseen Listing of all museums? Father was a bush pilot, plane in airport museum, plane crashed, dug out of tundra in 1986
    Tim B Cambell's soup company had collection of soup tureens loaned by museum
     

     

  • Ann Root, Mike Burrill, Carolyn Burrill, Ben Truwe, Hew MCElroy, Larry Smith, Carolyn Kingsnorth, Chelsea Rose, Chris Walker, Linda Turner, Phil Long, Pat Harper

    Chris- yes need physical space

    Chelsea – need professional curator who is full time

    Phil – if museum, where should it be?

    Chris – J’ville

    Larry- where we are now

    Chris – make History Center part of the rebuilding of Medford

    Other buildings in Medford (a few were mentioned, incl. DairyGold)

    Mike – urban renewal money

    Chris – economic development funds

    Chris – downtown Tuesdays, promotions used to happen

     

  • Doug McGeary (SOHS President) Susan Walsh (Provost & Vice President for Academic Affairs            Sue Densmore (Communications Consultant) Ron Kramer (past Executive Director of Oregon Public Radio) Dr. Lee Murdock (Pediatrician, Family Nurturing Center Board) Ken Gregg  (Jacksonville Councilman) Lindsay Berryman (past Medford Mayor, Heart of Medford Association) Jeff LaLande (SOHS) Linda Turner (SOHS)  Vicki Ann Bryden (SOHS) Sheila Baker (SOHS) Alice Mullaly (SOHS) Larry Mullaly (SOHS

    • Ron Kramer: Recommends curated on-line exhibits that are heavily promoted. Every exhibit would be part of an expanded bank of resources that could be shared around.
    • Lindsay Berryman: Take photographs from your collection, mount and post them all over Southern Oregon.
    • Sue Densmore:  In 1980 there was an exhibit of downtown Medford, showing what the Medford of the future could look like.  I still have much of this artwork. Eventually this became urban renewal. It is very hard for anyone to know what is in your collection since they never see it.
    • Ron Kramer:  Suggests that SOHS work with the owner of the Sparta Building to obtain temporary use of its ground floor as an exhibit gathering space.
    • Dr. Lee Murdock:  I understand that the Penny’s main hall has excellent acoustics. You might consider its use for gathering and music performances. There are lots of possibilities that this building offers.
    • Larry Mullaly:  The challenge is that SOHS needs to continue operating with a very well managed budget.  The trick is to strike the right balance between what we need to sustain ourselves and the  services we can offer.
    • Doug McGeary:  The display of artifacts by itself is not a significant income source.
    • Jeff LaLande: There is always the politics between Medford and Ashland that have to be dealt with. Briscoe School is being remade as community center and may be a site that SOHS could take advantage of for offering displays or programs in Ashland. Another potential partner in Ashland is the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.
    • Sue Densmore:  You have accomplished some impressive things. You have successfully downsized, and have made Hanley Farm into an important venue.

     

  • Attending: Sue Kupillas, Mary Anne Pitcher, Ben Truwe, Larry Mullaly, Doug McGeary, moderator, Alice Mullaly, note taker

    MP—share MORE

                Change perception by getting things out

                Do road shows with artifacts

     

                SK—Use model of Artist in the Schools by have Historian in the schools. Bob Russel          would be good for that.

     

                AM--All Jackson County Historica societies make up a trunk and make available to the     schools

     

Question 5: Where does SOHS go from here?

  • liz: Another levy?

    Ben: Problem getting on the ballot

    Tam: Lack of understanding that it was a district tax. Need a vision carry it out for the next 3-5 years; and we need to be on the ballot in a favorable election,

    Sheila:  we should be using this building more now that Kid Time will be out

    Al: we should form a committee to go out to school districts, RCC, SOU and say Thank You for helping us but now we need to accomplish several goals and would they continue to support SOHS

    Peter: Focus County Commissioners on the fact SOHS is not the same organization it was, and not run by the same people

    Sheila: We have a building, have a capital campaign for it

    Al: Rogue Valley Transit District failed 60-40, but then talked to major companies and RCC and others, designed campaign around their needs and it was successful

    Dawna: If SOHS wants to be in this building what about partnership with schools for trade work (building exhibits, etc)

    Tam and AL: all comes down to marketing.

     

     

     

  • Keep hitting the media, maybe the new owners of the MT will run articles if we provide them. 

  • Attendees: Ron Brown, Stephanie Butler, Larry Mullaly, Kira Lesley, Carolyn Kingsnorth, Phil Long, Robert Hamilton, Gretchen Hamilton, Gayle Lewis, Jeff LaLande, Pat Harper, Andrea Patterson, Jack Patterson.

    Jack: Have a vision, go for another bond issue, we need stable funding

    Larry: What about partnerships?

    Ron: Have to parner with other historical societies

    Jeff: Need to heighten visibility, TV spots, As It Was to broader audience

    Ben: SOHS programs designed for narrow audiences (eg WIT at noon, As It Was on JPR)

    Carolyn: we need visible place where we are doing things. EG WIT is associated with libraries more than SOHS

    Jeff: Programs in small communities

    Stephanie:  outreach is key. Groups to reach are teachers. Provide speakers, but at least charge nominal fee or request donations. We need a place to go.

    ?: "Not everyone wants to go to a farm"

    Stephanie: We used to give talks at Valley of the Rogue State Park, $100 per talk

    Kira: Relationships with breweries?

    ?: Had an event recently at Common Block Brewery

    Pat: It was terrible, way too noisy

    Jeff: Standing Stone in Ashland a possibility. Howie's on Front has science nights?
     

    Stephanie's notes:

    We have to have a solid vision before we can rally the support of
    the community. Stable funding base and a vision. Who are our community partners? We need to
    heighten the visibility of the SOHS first like an As it Was on TV. Outreach and reciprocal
    relationship by asking for a donation and speaker honorarium. Everything that we do has to be
    branded properly in some way so people are more connected to us. Photos must be credited.
    Do we use the History Center building as a museum?

     

  • Present: Phil Long, Billie Taylor, Alice Mullaly, Hew McElroy, Bill Gates, Hazel Smith

    Billie: Hire curator and have museum exhibits

    Hew: Commercial buildings, one there big enough, auto dealers

    Bill: Hotels

    HazeL: Credit union, bank, Rogue FCU

    Bill: HIstory made by you, Amy Drake

    Phil: Website tells about that exhibit, history passport for kids, history makes sense in the context of community. 80% of kids are in public schools.

    Hew: Gataher info to get clearer vision

    Hazel: Let people know what we are doing. Signage at History Center and Hanley Farm

    Phil: Focus on rest of story. Hanley seems separate and soon will fund itself.

    Hew: What do we do when Kid Time leaves. Need to replace that income

    Bill: Build where the money is. Billings for example. Do we still want to be in Central Medford.

    Hew: Larson building is an older building more cost effective than a new one. Bug buck donations will be needed for anything. 

     

  • Present: Alice Mullaly, Linda Turner, Doug McGeary, Hazel Smith, Kevin Keating, Vicki Bryden, Carol Holst, Monte Holst, Pat Harper

    HS: Move forward

    LT: Get our building back, add artifacts, Museum is our missing piece

    CH: When Kid TIme is gone, can we have event space in building

    DM: Rent to a compatible organization and share?

    VB: Rent some space, keep some

    LT: How to separate rented offices from museum space?

    MH: When Kid Time isn't paying rent, what happens to SOHS finances?
    CH: Should sponsors be a focus?

    KK: THere is money in the valley, ask wineries, Lithia, other companies

    LT: We have supported Butte Mill and HOlly, we need our turn after they have completed their projects

    PH: Like the concept we have held back for their sakes

    DM: We need to get SOHS's house in order. Need to show we are ready to provide services

    VB: Also have to catch economy at the right time

    LT: Need to have a ause

    DM: example in Mt. Ashland, very successful

    VB: Cause is to pay off building, open museum

    AM: SOHS's debt is the white elephant

    VB: Selling history center wouldn't raise enough for new building

    LT: Could part of Hanley Farm be sold?

    Everyone: No

    HS: Keep having conversations, an amazing idea might come up

    LT: What about a donated building?

    MH: A lot of empty spaces in the area

    PH: How long a term could we get a donation for?

    AM: We have gotten donations for the music festival, could raise $ for traveling exhibits

    LT: Traveling exhibits need time, staff, fixed museum would be better

    KK: His school, and others, can provide student volunteers

    PH: Does the group think we could pass a tax measure?
    HS: No
    KK: Yes
    MH: We need more members to support a tax
    CH: Museum would appeal to voters

    LT: Could raise more $ if we have a space for events 

     

  • Participants were Larry Mullaly (Moderator), Paden Voget, Sharon Feil, Greg Applen, Pam Sasseen, Ron Hillers, Jerry Doran, Judith Meuser, Doug Loughdal (FNC), Kristen Galabrun (FNC), Pam Sasseen, Rocky Wales, Rhonda Nowak, Tam Moore; Isaiah Webb.

     

    1. Try to reach out to the public and schools more to get information out;
    2. Smart phone interpretation similar to what Siskiyou County is doing;
    3. Computer programs for kids;
    4. Open house at Hanley Farm every weekend for artists;
    5. Podcasts and multi-media outreach;
    6. Tap into local farm animal organizations to bring animals to the farm; and
    7. Parking lot garage sales at Hanley Farm;
    8. Further support at-risk families.
  • Bill Maentz, Carolyn Kingsnorth, Bill Gates, Pam Sasseen, Pat Harper, Doug McGeary, Liz Koester, Doug Sasseen, Sue Musolf, and 5 guests attended

    It was asked what we will do when Kids Time vacates the J.C. Penny building. Doug McGeary said there are several options being considered, such as re-leasing the facility to another group, selling the building, using it as our museum, etc.  Until that time, he asked “what do we do now?”  Suggestions included getting more grants; soliciting donations using enticements, such tax incentives, rewards associated with each level of donation, etc.; encouraging members to include the Society in their wills; holding fundraisers; and matching-funds donations, such as offered by the Oregon Cultural Trust. It was agreed – we need to increase our member base, attract younger members and volunteers. It was suggested we can get more volunteers through partnering with other associations.

     

     

  • Attending: Doris and Lynn Sjolund, Valerie Root, Barbara Moore, Jennifer Laughlin, David Sours, Al Minnick, Sheila Baker, Doug Mc Geary, Cyndi Noyes, Larry Mullaly (Moderator), Alice Mullaly (recorder)

    DS—need a signature event like Festival of Trees

    CN—music festival might become that

    DS—optimize volunteer time—have fewer larger events

    AM—having many volunteers working several events keeps them connected to SOHS

    DM—need to keep history in our events

    LM—ask small societies to join in the Living History Days

    JL—need more revenue—who is trying to get grants?

    Show our value to the community

     

  • •       Where does SOHS go from here? How do you make history relevant, fun and engaging? Is history 100 years ago or 50 or 25? I would find a way for children to tell the story. or a version of it. I'd create a way for grandparents to edutain their grandchildren by being able to tell a story of their own using your artifacts. If grandma used to have to pump the well, pump it and how haw hard it was to get a bucket of water. School house. Transportation. Agriculture. 

     

  • Community Conversations Ashland Public Library August 22, 2018

    Attending: Linda Walker-Turner, Larry Mullaly, Sam Whitford, Dennis Powers, Mary Jane Cedar Face, Mary O’Kief, Mollie, Owens, Ben Truwe, Phil Long, Bill Gates, Dick Thierolf, Susan Kiefer, George Kramer, Alice Mullaly, Doug Mc Geary

    MJCF—with limited funds the History Made by You exhibits were very effective.

    MOK—Where does funding come from?

    Answer from board members: Membership, events, endowments, grants, earned income.

    PL—these things are often perceived as Hanley Farm.

    DM—Or the museum that was.

    BG—When we are more stable we can go for public funding

    GK—you have a marketing challenge. Need to redefine your story so people will know why to give money.

    1. If you could give one piece of advice to SOHS, what would it be?

                MO—look at fund raising, build on the Music Festival

                MJCF—Narrow the focus and get the message out

                DP—Focus on important needs: membership, endowment, marketing

     

                SW—Have 15 small exhibits that rotate through the libraries. Sends the message we are out there and we need support.

     

                SK—Get the Chambers involved. Business needs to help more.

     

                DT—Resist the temptation to spin off Hanley Farm. Keep it as one institution.

     

     

     

  • Moderated by Doug McGeary, attended by: Tim Balfour; Anne Billeter; Eli Mathews; Bob Hackett; Todd Kepple; Doy and Rick Towsley; Dick Gordon; Amy Drake; Chris Sanz; Aaron Hoefling; Ben Truwe; Sheila Baker; Doug McGeary; Linda Turner; Pam and Doug Sasseen; Pat Harper

     



    Sanz Get back confidence from the public so we have something to build on; HF is a good place to start
    ? Tell the story of the artifacts. Capturing and engaging people 
    Tim b Beekman House tours use SOHS artifacts and tell the stories
    pam s maybe we could have theme-based tours at Hanley Farm
    ? Where is history going? How will it be? Not a single culture's narrative. It's getting more complicated, need to pull in
    anne b That's why SOHS has to keep accepting artifacts. 

     

  • Ann Root, Mike Burrill, Carolyn Burrill, Ben Truwe, Hew MCElroy, Larry Smith, Carolyn Kingsnorth, Chelsea Rose, Chris Walker, Linda Turner, Phil Long, Pat Harper

    Larry – add staff

    Chris – marketing campaign to educate and raise money, but need to be clear what the money is for

    Chelsea – partnership with library is great. What if we partnered with Kid Time? IF county won’t give money back, would they partner with us in some way? Perhaps pay for a curator?

     

  • Doug McGeary (SOHS President) Susan Walsh (Provost & Vice President for Academic Affairs            Sue Densmore (Communications Consultant) Ron Kramer (past Executive Director of Oregon Public Radio) Dr. Lee Murdock (Pediatrician, Family Nurturing Center Board) Ken Gregg  (Jacksonville Councilman) Lindsay Berryman (past Medford Mayor, Heart of Medford Association) Jeff LaLande (SOHS) Linda Turner (SOHS)  Vicki Ann Bryden (SOHS) Sheila Baker (SOHS) Alice Mullaly (SOHS) Larry Mullaly (SOHS

    • Sue Densmore:  Exhibit and develop curriculum for use in the schools.
    • Doug McGeary: Develop educational trunks of items and curriculum that could be shared in schools and with other historical societies.
    • Susan Walsh: You are on the right track: congratulations to SOHS for conducting these listening sessions.
    • Lindsay Berryman:  it is hard to find sustainable funding.  Keep trying to find a Signature funding event.
    • Dr. Lee Murdock:  You are fortunate to have such a strong volunteer base.

     

  • Attending: Sue Kupillas, Mary Anne Pitcher, Ben Truwe, Larry Mullaly, Doug McGeary, moderator, Alice Mullaly, note taker

    MP—interns

                Be more visible and get the collection out

                Facebook—put an item on each week

                Use snapchat and Instagram as well

     

                SK—Conversations really good

                Keep a consistent message that is proactive and doable

                Preface: “This is what we are doing and this is why we are doing it.”

                You are a new, inclusive organization doing things a new way.

                You are the “New Southern Oregon Historical Society” that is taking the past and making            the future.